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cuts which is the true source of the deficit problem along with anemic economic growth. and here's one. we just got confirmation that the latest fiscal numbers from the treasury department show the federal government ran up more red ink in october than it did the year before, and guess what? spending went up double digits from the year before. what a surprise. but the white house got one thing right today. it released a study showing that a massive year-end tax hike would kill consumer spending by $200 billion, right. so let's not raise taxes. and in addition to all of this, the joint chiefs of staff is apparently drawing up plans to keep 10,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan past the 2014 deadline. this break a president obama promise, but some promises are made to be broken, and i think this is probably a good move. but first up congress back at work tonight after the holiday recess with now just 35 days to go. are we any closer to a tax and fiscal cliff fix? cnbc's own chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us now with all the details. good evening, john. >> reporter: good ev
player in the deficit talks. >> i am really worried we have a probability we could go over the cliff, and that would be catastrophic. not to go over the cliff, we have to compromise, have to have revenue. the problems are real, the solutions are painful, no easy way out. the only way you can do this ifs to have a balanced approach and that is where people are headed. connell: matt welch is here. what do you make of all this, matt? >> there is nobody at the table actually interested in cutting the size of the government. that seems strange to democrats who think we're living in some sort of mythical age of austerity. we had a really good shot. george w. bush used the hell out of spending four years. i don't think john boehner is ultimately interested in it. talkiig $110 billion, the smudge of potential cuts and they're negotiating it away without any entitlement. dagen: are we past the point with no return? will we become even more of a nation centered around our government that does not promote private business? will anybody ever fix this? >> we will fix it. everything is ultimately
social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury bonds it holds in its trust fund. but conservatives point out the money to redeem those bonds comes from taxpayers. >> it is money that is coming out of general revenue that is going into social security that reduces the amount of revenue that is available for everything from aircraft carriers and roads to environmental issues. >> reporter: legally, social security is off-budget, meaning its cash flow is not considered part of the budget deficit. and defenders argue the money used to pay off the special treasury bonds in the social security trust fund are no different than the money owed to any other bond holder. >> we're using social security as a piggy bank to deal with the problems in t
should address the drivers of the deficit. social security is not currently a driver of the deficit. that's an economic pact. while the president supports engaging with congress on a separate tract to strengthen social security, for entitlements we need to look at medicare and medicaid. >> joining to us talk about that and more is alan krueger, chairman of the council of economic advisers. can you help us interpret what jay carney just said? a lot of republicans have gone into this debate and discussion saying, you want more in taxes but in the same time we have to have entitlement reform. is he taking that off the table, mr. krueger? >> the president has pursued a balanced approach all along. he's had entitlement reform on the table. if you look at budgets, there are tough decisions there relating to health care costs, which are driving our deficits. additional revenue from upper income earners. >> medicare is still on the table when it comes to discussions about the fiscal cliff but not social security? what exactly are we talking about? >> as jay carney said, social security is not a d
term -- deficit reduction -- that is important to america's credibility. it is important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced, and that means significant revenues and that paying has to go around. that means the wealthy and well-off have to pay their fair share as well. these should not be new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we
to hammer out a deal on the greek deficit. prime minister says they're cle. politicians are considering a debt forgiveness program but could see talso reaching agreement on a framework for the planned eurozone banking union. speaking to the ft, the eu internal markets commissioner said ministers must meet a december deadline in order to placate financial markets. and this as in spain voters in cat take loan i can't giving a victory to the separatist party, but the region's president lost ground. so what does it mean for the push for independence and the deficit reduction plans? julia is in barcelona for us. what does it all mean? >> it's being seen as broadly positive because it weekens his push for independence in the region right now. but the overriding message is that two thirds of the people that voted here voted for pro nationalist or separationist parties here. and this is a sentiment that's been growing over a number of years. and the president has to try to align himselves with other parties bearing two key facts, where does he take the push for a referendum, how does that influ
. it is still about three times the average deficit under bush. let us go back to the clinton tax era. eileen anywhere between republican and libertarian. up -- yes i am not. i lean anywhere between republican and a libertarian. host: what do you make of republicans up on capitol hill -- to sort of a back off the tax pledge that he took when he ran for senate, saying he would not raise taxes. caller: if we are going to raise taxes my important thing is raising them on everybody. because if they try to strike a compromise where only the rich get taxed, then it gets more progressive. it is not a point to help the budget. we are right to raise taxes, raise them all the way down to where clinton had them. host: senators lindsey gramm represented peter king, talking publicly abandoning the pledge of democrats will talk seriously about entitlement reforms. rest in peace, grover norquist? there are not enough republican tax hikes -- republicans to hike taxes for obama. the left is doing its best to make tax hikes appear to be a foregone conclusion. that is their take on tax hikes. eddie, on our line
rate will necessarily go up. we talk about debt and deficit in this chamber, if we remember less than 12 years ago, 12 years ago we hit a budgetary surplus of $258 billion. meaning that we were taking in $258 billion more in each year than we were spending. how was that possible? it was made possible by having created 22 million private sector jobs in the previous eight years. . what was the policy then? the policy was to invest in the american economy, in the american people, in education, in scientific research, and infrastructure. so i think the lessons from our most recent past are very instructive today as to what we should be doing in washington to promote growth. the gentleman from california spoke of a plan i was working on, that's a $1.2 trillion investment in rebuilding the roads and bridges of america. that plan, advanced by the new america foundation, would create 27 million private sector jobs in five years. the first year alone, over five million jobs which would reduce the current employment rate from where it is today to 6.4% and in the second year, 5.2%. now public in
, michelle, why is this such a crisis? we're going to have about $.5 trillion in deficits in 2013. is that a crisis? for god's sake, we're finally doing something to address our debt and deficits. that should be great news. i'll tell you why gold might be down today. why is the market rallying when gold, oil, and copper are down? the only tentity borrowing all this money is the government. that's why gold is going down. guess what? don't worry about it. they're going to punt on this like they have every other time. >> are you as pessimistic? are they going to punt? what do you do? >> in the short-term, you have to be careful. these are unknowable things. it's a very fluid situation, as you identified. somebody gives us some happy talk. this market goes straight up. i think gold is giving perhaps a false signal there won't be qe-4. i believe there will be. it's just a matter of time. this is going to take time to implement. we're not going to put all these changes in place january 1. there's no grand bargain out there that's going to cover all these things at once. it's going to be
box and reduce the deficit, they spent it. he has no savings in his budget. he wants to count savings because he is not in iraq anymore. they threw him out. that is why he is not in iraq anymore. connell: we will obviously come back to this over and over again. grover norquist, thank you. dagen: we will stay on the topic of warren buffett and taxes. should the cut off the $500,000 not $250,000 as the president wants. would that ease some of the burden and pain of higher taxes? >> on one level it would, of course. raising that threshold from $250,000 to $500,000. the buffet idea maybe release a little bit of pain, but does nothing to address the extortions that he is talking about. huge distortions. 160,000 pages of distortions in the tax code. you were talking about a tiny, tiny improvement. i will take it, sure. we are getting distracted on this one. dagen: connell was talking about a minimum tax on the wealthy. he starts out $1 billion a year. 30%. a good idea in the abstract? then he starts talking about his brother in. those are multi billionaires, dude. >> i mean, i think these a
budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. > uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff negotiations is to communicate. >> tell the world and the individuals in the political establishment that they have to help get their act together or we have a problem, and that notion of preaching from the pulpit that he has is very fundamental. >> susie: is there another role or more of a role for the fed? >> i think to be a cheerleader and to be on the sidelines telling the government they have to do what is right for the public. >> susie: as for what the fed can do if the u.s. heads into re
deficits close to 4% to 5% over the next decade and that's cbo forecasts. if that occurs, you're talk about the debt getting more and more out of control. because the u.s. is the global reserve council, it's reliant on global reserve investment. >> just want to make sure that people have enough treasuries to trade. that's all it's about, charles. isn't that very generous? >> it is very generous. but left unaddressed, the fiscal problem is beginning to be a problem. but equally they don't want the full hit at this stage. so it is a matter of coming to some compromise, so you are going to have to see some kind of adjustment on the taxation side. that is what everyone is hopeful for. but it's still a political game. >> and we've been burned before. let's recap in the meantime a couple of developments in europe overnight. the european commission is expected to approve the restructuring plans of spags's na -- spain's national lenders today. a token price of -- yes -- one euro. the valencia-based lank was one of four to be nationalized in the past 12 months. and hundreds of greek workers marched
in interest rates, $2.4 billion we take in. there's a $1.1 billion deficit. if that keeps up -- >> trillion. you're talking trillion-dollar deficits every year. >> if that keeps up, the spending goes to $6 billion. what we take in goes to $4.6 billion. you have a $1.4 billion deficit you're going to deal with in ten years with $1 trillion debt. interest payments you have to make every year. when you're making interest payments of $1 trillion a year, everybody is going to stop investing. germany isn't going to buy our bonds anymore. >> maybe they want this. it seems like both sides are digging in. the president says he wants $ .6 trillion in revenue. that means higher taxes as well as taking the loopholes away. maybe he wants to go over the cliff to prove a point. >> going over the cliff to prove a point is like wrecking your car to show that you can't drive. i mean, it doesn't make any sense. what makes sense is to be thoughtful. a democrats and a republican two years ago, simpson/bowles, got together and put together some guidelines that nobody paid any attention to. it had to do with heal
. it almost makes me upset. interest rates are going down because they can't get a hands l on the deficit because stocks are going down. that's the reality we're dealing with. consumer confidence this morning, listen, i'm worried about the fiscal cliff. i have my button on. anybody who tries to put words in the general public's mouth about the fiscal cliff, these confidence numbers dispel that notion that they're worried. they probably don't even really know the details. >> david kudlow, you are taking something of a risk-on strategy. you're going with the high-growth, high-dividend plays in this market, aren't you? >> yeah, we are. it's a strategy that's worked quite well p the uncertainty we've had over the fiscal cliff. with the positive economic data coming in, high-growth areas have done well for us. hi areas have helped diversify and steady the portfolio. >> you're not worried about impact that the fiscal cliff could have on the tax treatment of dividends out there? you get all these companies imposing early dividends, special dividends to try and slip it in before the end of the ye
plus dollars deficit. we need way more than these kind of things to fix this. we need to cut spending. that is what we need to do. this is the only way we will balance the budget. melissa: you make a point not everyone has made, just the impact of the stock market of what is going on. raising taxes on investment doesn't even hurt as much as just how much government spending is going on. >> i will try. this is the heart of economics. call it the cloud or the smart phone or the tablet, those technologies to throw out productivity efficiency. and the games society makes from these technologies, we get reinvested, sort of the savings we had from using a tractor on the farm, so the price of food goes down, the resources get redirected into something new like inventing an automobile, if the government steps in and spends that money, takes it away, taxes it and spends it, we don't get the full benefit of the technologies that we are inventing. that is why we have a percent unemployment rate, growing 2% today. if we had a smaller government, we should be growing faster and have more jobs and
is that although it's running a primary deficit, actual servicing makes if worse. so one thing you can do is take away some of the debt burden to enable them to try to get the economy back into some sort of primary surface situation. but imagine we have a baby crawling across the floor and it keeps crawling away from us. we're picking up up the baby and bringing it back closer to us, but it's still crawling. so as soon as you put it down, it's heads off back where it came from. so the real problem with greece, they say the good news is we'll stay in the euro. really? the problem for greece is that greece in the euro appears to be uncompetitive. you either come out of the euro, and you have big significant drop in the value of your currency so everything that you do, no one would seem there is much change in import costs, but suddenly everything in greece is more than competitive. but if you stay, instead of the currency dropping 0%, every person's salary has dropped 30%. so this gets much, much harder. >> it's clear the internal devaluation is much more difficult, but also that it has been happen
are going to have to look at entitle reform. entitlement. reform is the only way to get the debt and deficit under control. we've got to take it on. >> chris: let me ask you, you say you would consider more revenue but with loopholes -- >> there's so many of them. >> chris: you voted against the bush tax cuts a decade ago because you said too many of the benefits go to the wealthy, not the middle class. once they were passed you have changed your view and said i'm not going to oppose them. it you could get a deal for entitlement reform and take a chunk out of the national debt, why is the 35% top tax rate which you oppose sacred? >> every economist i respect says if you raise tax rates at this time -- the president says that a couple of years ago -- it harms the economy. we're trying to help the economy. unless i'm convinced raising tax rates will be beneficial, obviously i think there's reason and grounds for my position. i also believe that we can and must get an agreement, otherwise i think first of all the markets are going to start reacting. >> chris: we'll talk about that in the next s
% of the trillion dollars deficit why risk slowing down the economy, which a lot of people say might happen if you increase taxes why slow the economy for such a collectively small amount of money? >> first thought don't think it is a small amount of money. we need a balanced approach. david: uribe 2% of the deficit unfunded if you do that. >> to look at the president's budget, what he proposes is raising $1.6 trillion proposing spending cuts as well, combination of which would put us on a sustainable path in the economy in the long run. what we should avoid doing is having gridlock, not extending the middle-class tax cuts would wish on our report today is if the middle-class tax cuts are not extended that will cause consumer spending to fall by $200 billion next year. that'll be an awfully big hit to the economy. liz: to a for somebody economic council, physically says middle-class tax cuts on consumer spending, everybody spends. how do we come to this agreement, we keep hearing left the tax cuts they now warren buffett came out with an op-ed in "the new york times" say saying we should make that
with an incredible deficit deduction in place. >> i plan to wake up with a big hangover. >> if we would go ahead with sequestration and increase in tax rates, they have to be happy. where is santelli on this? >> he does wear a pin, santelli. it's a good question. >> look, i just think that it is true that january may not be a debacle. as someone that cares about -- let's put my cards on the table. higher stock prices. we ain't going to go in that direction. it's not good for the stock market. >> we hear it all the time from business leaders. i heard it yesterday. head of north american m&a. if you get me a deal, i as ceo am going to make significant decisions that i'm not making now. >> there it is. it's the decisions. it's the decision to hire. decision to invest. it's a little dicey. you don't know what the world is going to look like. i think that the guy i care about may be more than the people meeting with president is jpmorgan head of m&a. these are few and far between. i spoke to ceo of pbh after interview he said i want to make money for shareholders taking advantage of the fact that int
the plan to a bankruptcy judge on friday. sa they need to close a nearly $46 billion budget deficit. new york and new jersey need at least $71.3 billion to recover from the devastation of super storm sandy and prevent similar damage from future storms. this is according to the state's latest estimates. that total of course could grow. steve liesman has been crunching the newspaperup i numbers and hn the next hour. this is to try to build up some sort of protection, some massive floodwalls. governor cuomo was saying this would be like $9.1 billion to start building. >> questions about the future of the sec following mary shapiro's exit. elyse walter could run the agent until december 2013 when she would have to be renominated and reapproved by the senate. among the issues, and ongoing battle over regulating the $2.5 trillion money market fund industry, some 63 unfinished rule making requirements that are all part of dodd-frank and continuing fears of course about market stability and high frequency trading. p. >> money markets used to be covered by the fdic when the crisis first came on.
and says the end for hp is not even sight. >>> also, japan has posted its worst trade deficit in october for more than three decades. exports dropped sharply amid territorial tensions between tokyo and beijing. it indicates the world's third biggest economy is inching closer to recession. this means the country would have seen its fifth technical recession in 15 years. at the same time, japan's opposition party promised a massive easing blitz meant to pull the economy out of its funk. that's if the ldp returns to power on december 16th. he promised to compile a large extra budget. he's also it rated calls to lift calls above the 1% target. >> translator: we should target inflation of 2% to 3%. i prefer 3%, but i will leave that up to the experts. i have never said the boj should directly buy bonds from the government. they should buy them from the market. >> his party is also considering the revision of the bank of japan law. yesterday the bank of japan chief hit back saying it was unrealistic. >>> just the latest in japan. let's get the market report kicked off by sixuan. >> let me star
. in other words, instead of a cliff, that you reduce the deficit over time in a much more orderly fashion. >> with a plan, though. >> with a plan. exactly. bowles simpson was a plan. >> bowles simpson is so far gone at this point. >> but when you look at those, they all have some come by neigh of spending cuts and tax increases. the idea is that over a period of time, you basically put the country in a better path, the government in a better path to spending and taxation. what you don't want is the fiscal cliff because that was designed to be something that nobody liked. and the reason is, yes, you've reduced the deficit from about 7% of gdp down to about 4% of gdp, so you move in the right direction really dramatically, but you do it in a way that nobody was happy with exactly where those cuts come from and exactly how the taxes increase. >> with what you're seeing, and we never know, it's almost like a mating dance where you've got the male and a feel of some species -- >> it's an ugly one. >> looks like they're never going to do it. they get closer and closer. >> but there is a lot of
, will congress be able to reach a fiscal cliff deal that really cuts spending and the deficit? wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> another busy news day. markets higher right now. we had the cease fire now announced between israel and hamas. if there isn't peace in washington on avoiding a fiscal cliff, will these gains go away in a hurry? >> joining us now, rich bernstein, cnbc contributor, anthony chan, and our own bob posani. bob, so far we've seen, what, t
want to eliminate the deficit or the debt? >> it eliminates -- it does not eliminate the annual deficit. it keeps the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. constant. >> rose: and that's what we can live with in essence. >> we can live with it. the net debt is around 73% or something like that. that was 120% coming out of world war ii. and it will stay in the 70s, might even come down into the 60s, the 18.5% and 21% won't increase the ratio of debt-to-g.d.p. and it may very well bring it down slightly. >> rose: what has this meant to you? this friendship with warren buffett? >> it's been a wonderful friendship. can you imagine the chance to warren buffett about almost anything? to ask his opinion about every story you've ever had on your mind? it's -- it's priceless. and it's been price tlos go at this book and to see it all put down again, to add my introductions and to see how good fortune was at staying with this man as as -- as i say, we were standing by while warren buffett was becoming warren buffett and it was a remarkable thing that we were allowed to do and i loved it. >> rose: i'm sma
not contributed to the deficit, and it shouldn't be part of the discussion. i think the press office said that the other day. we completely agree with that. we should set social security aside. it is solvent for decades and by simply kicking in the social security tax above $250,000 you can make it solvent or decades more. so that's less of an issue i think in reality than it is in the long time republican desire to attack it whenever they can. remember, this is a party that tried to put it into the stock market just before the crash. >> i remember. >> so they have a long history of going after social security and we have to, i think, set it aside. medicare is a more complicated problem because we have a health care system in this country that's immensely expensive, way too expensive, somewhere between $700 billion and $1 trillion a year by most standards, and 40% of that washes back through the federal budget. my position is that if we're going after the old folks on medicare and cutting their benefits, if we're going after the families who have a disabled child who couldn't take care of
viewers to know you have balanced -- balanced two previous budgets if not more, you have closed deficit holes of more than 4 billion dollars. you have had success. >> we went from a 4.2 billion dollars deficit to two one time budgets with no tax increases. but we have pensions that are eating up a good portion of the budget that we're going to have to address. if all of a sudden this federal money that has been coming to the state and going down to the local communities is cut off, we're going to have to sit back and say what services can we provide and what services are going to disappear? but what concerns me more is the unemployment that it's going to create. i think the cbo has said that unemployment could go over 9%. liz: you're ahead of the national average higher actually. >> we created some tax incentives to bring the petrochemical industry, the plastics industry near that facility, that would create thousands of jobs more. we believe we could reindustrialize southwestern and western pennsylvania, if we're able to move this forward, but the economy as you know certainly can have
it will be a modest reduction in the rate of increase in spending such the we will have a $1 trillion plus deficit next year. more of the same. lou: as always. >> thank you. lou: up next to illegal immigrants wants new privileges because, i hate to tell you, it looks like pandering is contagious. imagine that. and forget susan rice. not the plot -- the biggest problem with this administration we will demonstrate to you the gaping holes in the benghazi time line and some extraordinary coincidences in the patraeus time line in the "chalk talk"e e next. fotheir annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy t sacked by blackouts. but it our tradition! that's roughg the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personaattention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care profess
it will be a modest reduction in the rate of increase in spending such the we will have a $1 trillion plu deficit next year. more of the same. lou: as always. >> thank you. lou: up next to illegal immigrants wants new privileges because, i hate to tell you, it looks like pandering contagious. imagine that. and forget susan rice. not the plot -- the biggest problem with this administration we will demonstrate to you the gaping holes in the benghazi time line and some xtraordinary coincidencesn the patraeus ♪ lou: benghazi, a lot of people are forgetting, pushing in out out of their mind or some organizationdon't pay attention. we will take extra time to refresh ourselves on the timeline of a cover-up. it began september 111 hour before 9:40 p.m. private securityyin benghazi in first calls for assistance came made calls on cellphones and in at precisely that time. at 11:00 p.m., unarmed drone drone arrivedo provide real-time intelligence to tripoli and washington broke 12 '07 a.m., the 12th they announced that she react claimed responsibility for the benghazi attack with devours tthey knew they had re
will not have any growth. >> look, let's be clear about this, you are running a $1 trillion deficit right now. those basically show you that you are going to get you to run 2% growth rate economy for the next decade and that is not strong enough to create the kind of employment, growth and environment economically that she wants to see. you have not seen that since the 1960s on an annualized basis. simply a function attacking the fiscal problems first. it was not until the tax cuts kicked in in 1983 that the economy really kicked off. thank you. good to see you both, have a good thanksgiving. lauren: say goodbye to the twinkie. and at least say goodbye to the twinkie right now because hostess and the union unable to agree to new labour terms. today host is back in court to wind down operations but also talks a possible buyer. thvery latest on the company's future. david: the move could have a big impact on our economy. some economists say it could be closing even more. coordinate traininhe spent yearg business joining us for an inside look. lauren: santa claus is making a list, the results of
-- or betting there will be a huge issues in the coming years on these -- on the deficit issue, you may want to keep it off the table. >>> there's a third area there. i don't talk to anybody, steve or our guest, who doesn't think the u.s. can easily ramp up growth. the real discussion i don't think is the true u.s. economy. i thinkist the moguling being throw in front of it, our self-inflected issues, you know, last time around we sequestration. are we going to have sequestration 2? of course we'll put a band-aid, but we need leverage to have reform predicated to surrender on the band-aid. >>> we've got to go, guys. i've got to go with this. we've got to move on. this is the last hour of trading, so we've got to move here. thank you for your thoughts today. steve, thank you, you're voting on a committee of politicians. i find hope in that somehow. >> yeah. you're in the hopeful camp. >> hoping at the last moment they will do the right thing. >> was that a pig that just flew by? the market is slowly coming off the lows. >> instead the last time the markets closed in positive territory on blac
the state budget deficit was more than 40% of its general fund. 40 percent. the second highest of any state. s&p and moody's both give illinois the second worst credit rating in all of the 50 states. illinois is funded 45% of pension liability, the lowest percentage of any state. unemployment in illinois, very impressive as well. just under 10%. they had things well in hand in illinois. is it mentioned that is a haunted the president obama? anyway, the tenth highest unemployment rate in the country. for stub's illinois a death spiral state because for every hundred private-sector workers in illinois there are 103 depending upon those private-sector workers. new york, aiming at the sixth worst death spiral state because for every 100 private-sector jobs in new york there are 107 who depend on the private sector for their -- well, their sustenance. a per capita debt of nearly $6,700. $6,700 just for the state of new york. the six highest in the country. we have people worrying about the fiscal cliff which is worth worrying about. some of these states have gotten a massive problems. these thre
large deficits, as well. so the politics in spain slightly skewed as they will be, but not so much pressure on rajoy at the moment. unlikely to ask for assistance in the short term. we also have another euro group meeting take, back in brussels, yes, i know, we seem to have one every week. they may come up with a long term financing deal for greece. finally talking about debt forgiveness in greece which is what we all know has got to happen. whether it can happen before the german elections in the fall next year is a mute point. anyway, that's where we stand. fairly down beat for equities and yields a little bit mixed. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much. let's get back to the fiscal cliff. we've been talking about the issues of taxes. as we mentioned, warren buffett calling for a minimum tax for the wealthy. he starts with suppose that an investor you admire and trust comes to you with an investment idea. this is a good one, he says, i'm in it and i think you should be, too. would your reply possibility be it all depends on what my tax rate will be on the gain you're sa
of the issue. >>> in global market news, japan logging its fourth straight trade deficit in october. the european debt crisis with china over a territorial dispute actually reduced exports. and we continue to follow the latest developments out of the middle east. secretary of state hillary clinton traveled to the west bank this morning to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. abbas heads the west bank, while the palestinian militant group hamas controls the gaza strip. hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the united states because it continues to refuse to recognize israel as a state. the united states has a policy of not negotiating with terrorist organizations. that's why she's not speaking with anyone in gaza. her visit comes hours after a meeting with israeli officials that lasted late into the night. >>> let's take a look at the markets this morning. we already showed you the futures. they are down slightly. dow futures down by about 23 points. in europe this morning, you'll see that -- also, by the way, a lot happened yesterday. ben bernanke started talking
manufacturing goods trade deficit has gone up. >> that might be true that some play dirty, why don't we as well. the risk is we encourage malinvestment. all these things made unique and special in the last 100 years in the economy, and that's innovation, that's resilience. had little to do with subsidies, but rather a unique playing field. let's not corrupt what's made dirty to keep up with the dirty players. >> i'm not suggesting we play dirty, and i disagree with your economic history a little bit. every successful history that's been incubated in the united states has been in yonurtured. someone makes cars in the united states. i'd like to see them made here. china, germany, japan, they all have car manufacturing. i think it should be smart, i think it should be sophisticated, i think it should be based on incentives and what the private sector wants. you can control that manufacturing. that's why ford is bringing manufacturing of the fusion back to the united states. it's why gm is bringing back some of its functions from india to michigan. it's why you've seen lenovo bring laptop manufactu
those breaks could be chopped to cut the deficit. are those worries overblown? a heated debated is coming up. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> let's get to mary thompson who has more on some of market action. >> more actually on all these companies paying out these dividends, michelle. consider this. last year only 44 members of the russell 3 o -- 3 000 had paid out a special dividend. why the rush? investors want to push out cash before the tax rates jump. take a look at these company names behind us. they're the one december clalar special dividends. on december 18th, a retail warehouse -- costco's payout, one of the ten largest out so far this quarter. in total, thos
% of the taxpayers and it's maybe $5 billion to $10 billion a year. relative to a $1 trillion deficit -- not saying it's nothing, but it's just such a tiny amount -- >> people at his income level are paying that. >> i have to say, if we're going to have a big tax debate, let's have one that really matters, now about this warren buffett rule which won't raise enough revenue to make a dime's worth of difference whether it comes to the federal budget. let's figure out what do we want to use our tax code for and what do we have to change to make it do that. >> let's move on to the next one which would put you in -- give you a real tax problem here. the powerball jackpot set for a record $425 million this wednesday. no winner over the weekend. what would you do with a half billion that came as a windfall to you? >> first thing i'd do, i'd give everybody i know a lot of money and say don't come back again. here you go. i'm going to seed all your brilliant ideas but that's all you get. second, i think i would look for -- a lot like peter thiel has done, look for underinvested ideas, writers, artists, tech
programs. only 38% think it's going to actually reduce the deficit. so, here we've got a debt problem, some would say a crisis, and people are just not confident that we're going to address it, certainly not with new taxes. >> well, that's right. and look, skepticism about politicians is as old an as america, part of our cultural dna. in fact, i was surprised only 4% think this'll spend the money instead of using it as they promise. and one of the other things that we're seeing and i think this is really important in these discussions, if you ask people about across the board spending cuts, what everything is included, everything is on the cable. 65% say that's a good idea. but if you take something off the table and say, cut everything, but the military, support falls to 42%, so americans want to make sure that this is not something that singles out a pet project for exemption and protection. >> if people think like this about the future of health care and think like this about debt. how come they reelected president obama? how did this happen? >> well, to some degree they didn't think it'
help the deficit. warren buffett can help them out. lori rothman and melissa francis with more coming up. dagen: the market is up, that is good. good afternoon read >> pushing for middle-class tax cuts without any spending concessio concessions, president obama to meet with business leaders on the fiscal cliff after speaking just last hour. we'll ask lou dobbs that he thinks ceos will help to make deals happen. >> now washington is looking at the one sacred mortgage deduction, maybe get rid of it to help heal the budget crisis. >> charlie gasparino on the future of the firm. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes, before the new york stock exchange, nicole petallides on the floor. a deal is possible by christmas. >> hoping to get some positive comments from john boehner. he is optimistic. a nice little boost. from negative to positive to the session highs, no 50 points away from dow 13,000 once again. the dow once again up 73 points. you have a lot of winners. the banking index is still under some pressure, but retailers are really stealing the show. many are doing well for a varie
to talk about comprehensive tax reform and talk about spending cuts and talk about debt and deficit reduction. pulling out an isolated piece like raising rates or taking a mortgage interest deduction or whatever it may be, it doesn't serve a purpose. you have to look at the entire problem. if you don't do that, we're all dead. >> where does norquist fit in? has your own view on the pledge evolved? >> i'm not for increasing tax rates. i'm for reforming the code, raising the base upon which those rates might be applied. i'm not for raising the rates. >> why is this attracting a -- why is revenue in general attracting the share of the debate? i heard complaints that say we're not giving due attention to reform, to entitlements. is it just that taxes are sexy, is that it? >> if the media would stop asking about it we could talk about comprehensive reform of entitlements and of spending. it's a complicated, complex process. if you pull out one part of it and have a debate over that part, you're redirecting america's focus from where it ought to be which is comprehensive reform of spendin
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